Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 10
CSPAN2 10
KQED (PBS) 5
CNBC 4
KRCB (PBS) 3
CNNW 2
FBC 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
WETA 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 47
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)
germany. one of the images germany has natural boundaries to the north and south with the alps and further burden the east and the west is flat plains, so germany had a war over the century with germany or france or that area and poland and because germany was a continental power sandwiched between the maritime europe on one hand and the heartland towards the other it was always problematic which we it would go and how it would develop. i can across this book by accident in early 1989. the berlin fall with -- berlin wall would fall but november. it had occurred to me after reading this book and other books that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was one. creation of german history that would reinvested soften different territory always in the future so today we have a united germany that trades immensely with poland and has had a wretch most wall -- to approach what and where the european union and the nato or meant to keep russia out and the germans down now they are triumphant economically. germany may not have the solution to every economic problem
. >> they brought him gold, frankincense and myrrh. >> very good. the christmas degree originated in germany based on a prop in a mid evil play commemorating adam and eve then came over to england and eventually the united states. do you know what country the christmas tree tradition came from? >> norway. >> united states? >> isn't it from norway? >> netherlands? >> united states. >> germany? >> germany? >> germany? >> am i right? >> i don't know. i'm just guessing. >> i am german ancestry. >> that hurts that you didn't know that? >> it does. >> what's that big thing right over there. what do you call that. >> a christmas tree. >> i think it's called a christmas tree. can you call it whatever you like as long as the people are with their families there is nothing wrong with it? >> they are calling it a holiday tree in rhode island because they want to be politically correct. >> it's a christmas tree. >> it's a christmas tree. >> i love christmas. >> you know there is a war on christmas, right? >> i haven't heard. >> no. you haven't heard of the war on christmas? >> no. how can you have a war with
is that the youeuropeans are only able to do that because in fact the us army lives in germany and actually picks up their defense tab. you can't do it -- there's nobody to bail out america the way germany's bailing out europe. >> john boehner was on the program the other night. he said hey, i wasn't consulted about this latest offer. i wish i was. this talk about republican conservatives, tea party members that were purged from certain committees because they had a criteria list if they didn't meet or match the leadership vote schedule. is that a message to the more conservative way of the republican party? >> i think so. he's absolutely right to be disturbed about it. it's not john boehner's job to make this math add up. it's not john boehner's job to find ways of funding a three and a half or four trillion dollar budget. it's insane. if the democrats want to have a three and a half, four trillion dollar federal budget, fine. they can be the party of that. there ought to be a party that represents an alternative and john boehner is saying no, we'll help you close that gap. who needs the republican
miles inside time in his east germany but was still a free city protected by the western powers. in november 1958, khrushchev delivered an ultimatum. the west had to be out of berlin and six months, or else. this is a crisis, the greatest crisis of the cold war up to that point. the press, congress and much of the eisenhower administration this men were. we need to show resolve, it was said, to beef up our troop strength and get ready to divide the red army. meeting privately with his advisers and congressional leaders, president eisenhower said we aren't going to do that. indeed he said we're cutting our forces in germany by 50,000. is advisors and accounting were bewildered. cut our troop strength? won't that show went to this -- won't that show weakness? i was all alone. he was heavily criticized in the press. but he is seen utterly unfazed. i've now had a great capacity to take responsibility. the amazing that famous photograph taken of ike on the eve of d-day, june 1944, general eisenhower as a supreme allied commander wearing his uniform and talking to a group of paratroop
and the flash point was berlin, the former german capital, 100 miles inside east communism germany, but still a free city protected by the western powers. in 1958, there was an ultimatum. the west had to be out of berlin in six months or else. this was a crisis, the gravest crisis of the cold war up to that point. the prez -- the press, congress, and the administration thought if meant war. we needed resolve to beef up the troops' strength and defy the red army. meeting privately with the leaders, president eisenhower said we're not going to do that. indeed, he said, we're cutting forces in germany by 50,000 men. his advisers and the congressmen bewildered. cut the troop strength? won't that show weakness? ike was all alone and heavily criticized in the press. he seemed utterly unphased. eisenhower had a great capacity to take responsibility. he may have seen that famous photograph taken of ike on the eve of d-day in june 1944. general eisenhower, the supreme allied commander, wearing normal uniform, talking to a group of paratroopers, geared up, faces blackened, ready to jump mind german lin
the soviet troupes out of eastern europe. going to let nato take over germany. unite germany and nato can have their germany as long as nato doesn't go further. these kinds of things are in the air. what does bush do? tianimen square happens, he suspended relations, but behind the scenes does business as usual with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in,
? >> chuck hagel was not to go to vietnam. he had orders to go to germany. he was at fort dix. he said i want to go to vietnam. in may and talk to the chaplain and psychologist, and after two weeks, he went to vietnam. he fought for his country, unlike his critics. he has bled for his country, unlike his critics. he understand war, unlike his critics. he did not have other priorities, like richard cheney, and never said it was going to be a cakewalk. he is prepared, ready, and bill cohen put it best. he has fought and bled for this country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national security advisers. >> iraq and iran, that is what upsets people about shock hegel and some of the things he had to say about them. >> he was a supporter of the war in iraq. he supported the war in afghanistan. he voted in favor. it is an odd dove. all the critics are now decrying that he supported these wars. now when it came time to redeem what is it pay losing war in iraq with the troop surge, he not only opposed it, he said it would be the worst disaster since the vietnam war, but it was a su
to germany. he was at fort d, new jersey and said i wanted to go to vietnam. they made him talk to the chaplain and pchologist. after two weeks, he went to vietnam. he has fought for his countntry unlike his critics. he has bled for his country unlike his critics. hehe understands war, unlike hisis critics. he does not have other incentives like dick cheney. he is prepared and r ready. bill cohen said it best. he has fought and bled for thisis country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national securitydvisers. >> iraq and iran, that is what upsets people about huck hagel. >> he supported the war in iraq, voted in favor, and supported the war in afghanistan. it is an odd de that supported the two were that all the critics are now crying. he also, when it camtime to dean what was a losing war in iraq with the surge, he not only opopposed it he said it would be the worst disaster since the vinam war, and it was actually a success. >> he has other problems thate will have to address. references that heade to gays, he will have to talk about the reference to the j
was not to go to vietnam. he had orders to go to germany. he was at fort dix, new jersey and said i wanted to go to vietnam. in may and talk to the chaplain and psychologist and after two weeks, went to vietnam. he has fought for his country, unlike his critics. he has but pours countries, unlike his critics. he understands war, unlike his critics. he does not have other priorities, as richard cheney did at the same time in vietnam. he never said it was going to be a cakewalk. he is prepared, ready, and bill, and put it best. he has fought for his country and but for his country. he knows the subject matter. ask jim jones and other national security advisers. >> two words, iraq and have -- iran. that is what upsets people about chuck a calamity had to say about those two. >> he supported the war in iraq, voted in favor and supported the war in afghanistan and is an odd dove that supported the two wars and all the critics are now decrying. he also, when it came time to redeem what was a losing war in iraq with the troop surge, he not only opposed it, he said it would be the worst disaster since t
in the communist in the anti-fascist movement in the united states after that but during the war after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states and the british decide that it's important for the soviet union is to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so offguard that the british were concerned that the soviets would capitulate at that point that the united states offers several things. the soviets made several demands and they promise matÉriel and they had a hard time delivering that for a number of reasons and for a couple of years. stalin said if you give them airplanes and other equipment we need to stay in the war, the united states tries under the effort of other people who are not quite assistance air in providing that so the second man was they wanted the same territorial concessions they have gotten from hitler in 1939 pact that their main demand was for the second front. they were fighting and the history of this period, the americans and the british throughout most of the war were fighting 10 nazi divisions combined and the soviets alone were fighti
the war after germany attacks the soviet union in 1941 the united states and the british decided they are going to support the soviet union because it is the key to the chance of surviving the war during the soviets and to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so off guard that they were concerned and the soviets are going to capitulate that but they offer several things and the soviets make several demands and promised the material and have a hard time delivering that in the first couple years but stalin says if you give the airplanes and the other equipment we need we can stay in a war. so that is the sincere effort other people are not quite as sincere and providing that. so the second demand, what they want with the concession that they had gotten from hitler in the 1939 pact, and their main demand was for the second. they were fighting. this is the history of this period the americans and the british troops out most of the work were fighting the not provisions combined and there were fighting to hundred, so they were desperate for the united states to open a second f
times for medical evacuation to a field hospital, getting them to germany to the hospital at lamb stool and bringing them on to the united states as soon as they have stabilized has led to .. many of these young men, and they are mostly young men, a few women, but mostly young men, surviving wounds that would have surely killed them in any prior war, even ten or fifteen years ago, and i remember the first time i but at walter reed and i went, met with the first quadruple amputee, he lost both legs and both arms, and all he wanted was to drive a car again. and i saw him again, maybe six months later, with pro they tick arms and legs, prosthetic arms and legs, it is amazing what science and medicine is doing for these young people .. but nobody should estimate, underestimate the magnitude of the rehabilitation challenge and the courage that it takes, day in and day out to try and come back from these terrible wounds and that is where there is not enough we can do for these kids. >> rose: are we over stretched? >> i don't think so. i think we were over stretched at the end of 2006 .. and p
surpluses to germany and japan. an astonishing number. 70% of the profits in the country were recycled into europe and japan. the marshall plan is a very small target. i will not bore you with details. when they go to washington, it is not an act of philanthropic on the pentagon -- and at the plant for be on the pentagon fell apart -- it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell.
to watch things in europe. the big day is the september 11th elections in germany and germany could be harder after the election. in the first half is the sent ceiling discussion and finally profits, personal income and production, if those can do better than the markets can lift but right now the view is for a nothing market from here till year end. once the seasonal increases go away, we could have tax increases rand spending cuts if we get a deal. why is that going on a headwind for the stock market? >> i think it will be. if the taxes go up, i think that's something that hurts consumer confidence. you've seen the retail sales in the last part of this season here, have sold off, and many people have said it's because of the fiscal cliff. >> kind of depressing when you say it's a nothing market between now and the end of 2013. how do you make money, if you want to see it's going to be a -- >> he knows rhyme going to say buy apple. it's up 20%, up 50% and some off a little bit. if it sells off, you'll have nice dividend stocks like ant anti--sizer, the subplatform of all of the sma
class. people did this. we decided that if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape doing better trading against the world. their companies are making money, and things heard that were not impossible, not possible in america, are actually happening in germany, and their wages went up five times faster than ours. there's something wrong inside the american political and economic system 689 that's what the book is about. >> who stole the american dream, thank you for being on
at all? >> "24" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. it's beamed in illegally by -- you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stunningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that i like amer
germany. were these regimes possible because of the uniformity? if that is the case, how did the myriad number of protestant denominations in the united states provide a unique defense against tyranny? >> i would not say -- i was not referring to just the soviet union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are religious, it does not make you write all the time. >> get i
's coat. happy new year, from germany. >>> now let's check in with randi kaye, who's in for anderson cooper with a look ahead at what's on "a.c. 360". >> we're keeping 'em honest ton the program. a 360 follow on a story that stunned all of us. people who are trying to capitalize on the tragedy of newtown. this woman has been arrested, accused of lying to federal agents. you'll hear some of the things she sent out on her e-mails, playing on people's kindness, trying to get money. s and also, late word that president obama will meet with congressional leaders tomorrow. keeping 'em honest, with both sides caught in a trap of their own making? we'll go live to the white house and capitol hill for the latest. and take a look at this, a tornado from the storm system that created holiday havoc across the country and it's not over yet. those stories plus the top ridiculist of 2012. it's all at the top of the hour, john. zp >> thank you, randi. we'll be watching. appreciate it. >>> our fifth story, outfront tonight, the viral political videos of 2012. now, there was no shortage of partisan no
to germany as an enlisted man. he insisted on going to vietnam where he faced serious combat. i just think he brings to it first vietnam veteran to be secretary of defense and the only enlisted man ever to be secretary of defense. i think those are credentials that are needed. >> woodruff: any thoughts on this. >> i think some people say the trial balloons are a sign of presidential weak finance they don't go up. they're not really. they're actually a smart way for the president to engage in this i think the opposition to hagel is growing. i think it is rooted in disagreements not just about israel but about defence cuts. but about his ease on iran which are significantly to the left of president. and because he doesn't have a lot of respect of former colleagues here which are chrorming out, and many of them in opposition. i think it's an unlikely nomination. >> woodruff: we return you both to the gun control discussion. we heard from the head of the nra, mark, today, wayne la pierre who is advocating putting an armed guard in every school. the president launched a task force this week. where
, her son raymond was killed in the korean war while a third son served in west germany in the same war. no mother should have to lose two sons to war. but her family's sacrifice will forever be part of history and i ask that we pass this bill with no reservation. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. speaker. at this time i yield such time as he may consume to my distinguished colleague from the state of michigan, mr. benishek. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognize. mr. benishek: i come to the floor today to urge my colleagues to support my legislation, h.r. 4378, a bill to name the post office building in munising, michigan, after the late mrs. elizabeth kinnunen. her story is that like many across this nation, she came to america as an immigrant to to have a better life. she came to the united states in 1903 and married oscar in 1909. they had seven children and worked hard all their life to ensure their children would have a shot at the american dream. t
the kind of transition you had in germany? today germany is to lay prosperous country. will south korea consider the north koreans to be their cousins and brothers? there is a huge disparity at this point. you can see the physical difference because of the questions of nutrition and the way they are raised. is a total state based on fear. the challenge is to figure out how to absorb water looking like two or three lost generations. host: foreign policy in review with eli lake. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independen ts. you can send us the tweet or e- mail, f twitter.com/cspanwj, journal@c-span.org. john kerry for secretary of state and chuck cale for secretary of defense -- chuck hayes cogel. how will these nominations go/ guest: chuck hagel has not been nominated yet. john kerry was announced by the white house on friday. the fact that kerry was announced does not bode well for the trial balloon of chalk .eguck hagel we have seen john mccain say they are going to vote for him. chuck hagel has been questioned by a nu
at very low interest rates. substitute the words the united states and greece, and china to germany and you have a world scale, the problem in the united states. the problem in the whole world. but let me just, following those comments, you know, you've got a single moment. [inaudible] decided to they want more unity or less. because the euro cannot survive unless they have more sense of some kind of central control. more sense of discipline before the crisis. which means some kind of limits on fiscal policy, but one thing, but it goes on fiscal policy. spain had a pretty good fiscal policy. they kept borrowing money to build houses. so we've got to have some kind of oversight of economic policy as part of the price of being in the union. they wanted -- [inaudible] monetary union without the economic union. doesn't work. so the proposals are out there, and i think they basically want to move towards more economic union. a lot of debate, a lot of reluctance. i think they're going to do in the end but this is something you can do overnight. but the fact they're willing to look at is a
in germany and poland and it is all over the place. in fact, there are 3,000 books on the internet talking about this. it has become a cash cow for people who want to cash in on this doomsday scenario. but, hey, look, look up in the sky. the sky is not on fire. we're not falling into a black hole. we're not colliding with planet x. in fact, it is raining and snowing for god's sake. >> and the mayan calendar, even the mayans don't believe it is the end of the world today. the mayan calendar, there is a new calendar that starts. we start all over, right? after today? >> it is cyclic. many of the indigenous people live close to nature. the winter solstice is the end and they hijacked it in order to promote book sales. >> let's all celebrate. we're all alive and the world has not come to an end. thank you very much. good to see you as always. "cnn newsroom" continues now with brooke baldwin. hey, brooke. >> suzanne, thank you so much. i'm brooke baldwin. huge news day. a lot to get to including the president's big announcement, saw it here on cnn, moments ago. senator john kerry tapped to repl
, it on to germany tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account fm schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control becae i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global research to get an edge. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 their equity ratings show me how schwab tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rates specific foreign stocks tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 based on things like fundamentals, momentum and risk. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i also have access to independent tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 firms li ned davis research tdd#: 1-800-345-50 and economist intelligence unit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus, i can talk to their global specialists 24/7. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and trade in my global account commission-free tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 through march 20. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 best part... no jet lag. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-866-294-5409 tdd#: 1-800-345-255
gross domestic product on healthcare. the next highest was france and germany. united king come 9.6. and germany and france on many measures are getting better healthcare out comes than we are. and we know if you fast forward to 2012 we're not spending that, we're over 18%. 1 in every 6 dollars in this economy is going to healthcare. and however much one saves on healthcare, 40% of that flows through to the federal government because the federal government is paying 40% of healthcare in this country, actually something more than that. there is lots of room to save money in this healthcare system and there by save money in medicare and medicaid. we're talking about a very small percentage about what we intend to spend over the next ten years in the savings that are being discussed. the same is true on discretionary savings. the president called for $200 billion. discretionary savings on top of the billion that has been done. but if we put it in perspective we're going to spend in the domestic accounts in the next ten years $11.6 trillion. so a $200 billion savings is 1.7% of what w
. germany's economic position is arguably deteriorating but still schauble there is relatively optimistic that the crisis is over. in the meantime what is also happening is this money is beginning to flow into, from the public safety net to support the banks so you have the recapitalization of the banks but that isn't of course good news for everybody in the case of the ipo from last year you have 53,000 small shareholders there effectively having their positions in the debt smashed against the whole. they've been selling out again today to try and retrieve what they can because it is in the negative equity and arguably they'll get nothing as we go through the motions further down the line. it lost another 25% of what is left of the market capitalization today. a number of the other spanish banks are also in negative territory and some of the spanish big industrials are also down today. under performance on madrid. just got to mention where we are on the greek banks. they are now going through a position where the central bank is saying we think they need 27, 28 billion euros. the questio
with mother nature in this way could have hugely negative consequences. russia 1.43 and germany, 1.41. at the very bottom of the list, other than certain countries where the information is not available, the bottom of this list was singapore at .78. i know we're dealing with so many issues nowadays and i blow a gasket over many of them, whether fiscal cliff, unfunded liabilities, at some point, growth is the answer. when you start considering where the engines of growth have been and what their population declines may be, it makes one wonder, where is the horsepower from global growth will come from and this at some point needs to affect the picks in your stock portfolio. back to you. >> rick, i'll take it from you, rick santelli. >>> even starbucks is worried about the fiscal cliff. and we'll take you live to one of those location as they launch their initiative. back in two. to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works,
in germany had trained dogs on the street. there were no robberies or assaults because people know that the dog would get them. the security is not working. children and adults need to be protected. it would be safer to have trained dogs in every school and the malls and big theater complexes. host: we got your points. john fund. guest: i am not sure it would be less expensive to have a handle and a dog. i grew up much of my life in europe. i understand they have strict gun control laws there. the top three in terms of fatalities until friday were in britain and germany. those were often used with assault weapons. people can get access to these weapons. if you are a criminal or criminally insane, you do not care about the law. host: this comes from twitter. there were some graphics this morning from "the washington post." the ban on assault weapons includes massachusetts, maryland, new york, and hawaii. 30 states require -- every port of the mental health of buyers -- require a report of the mental health of buyers. what do you make of the mental health requirements and awaiting pe
. >> more on life in soviet east germany, poland, and hungry from world war two to 1956. saturday night at 8:00 on c- span's q&a. the department of homeland security discussed the importance of strengthening in securing america's critical infrastructure against natural and man-made threats. they recognized the aging railroad networks and expressed the need to rebuild and sustain networks. this event is about 35 minutes. >> i have the honor and a pleasure to introduce suzanne spaulding. she is famous for her introductions. we will pale in comparison to . she oversees infrastructure protection and risk management and analysis. she will enhance the resilience of critical infrastructure. she had spent nearly 25 years working on national-security issues. she was a principal in the bingham consulting group. s house of rep. she has also spent six years at the central intelligence agency and served as senior counsel and legislative director for u.s. senator arlen specter. suzanne sent us a note. i will read the note. in that no she said, -- notes she said, family members may disagree on outcomes, bu
telling the country of mexico if they would enter the war on the side of germany, the central powers, they would help mexico invade the united states and take the states of texas, new mexico, and arizona and give them to the country of mexico. so the united states entered the war on april 7, 1917. h.r. 3159 would create a commission to commemorate the 1th00 anniversary of world war i. over 116,000 americans died in world war i. that's more than in korea, vietnam, and both iraq wars and afghanistan combined. madam speaker, to my left is a photograph of american doughboys as they were called because of the color of their uniform, going over out of a trench over the top as it was called in world war i. primarily teenagers like most of our wars. the teenagers go to fight those wars. and they are leaving the trench going into what is called no man's land. those americans served along with their allies in world war ii. two u.s. presidents served in world war i, harry truman, dwight eisenhower. and if world war ii veterans were known as the greatest generation, then world war i veterans sho
and wounding specialist ian placek, who is currently undergoing medical treatment in germany. and we pray for his full recovery. today we honor the lives of sergeant first class lindy and specialist orguard. our thoughts and our programs arour prayers arewith their fams as well. sergeant first class lindy of devil's lake, north dakota, led a distinguished military career since enlist not guilty the north dakota national guard in 1990. during the course of his career, he served with the north dakota national guard as well as the united states army and the montana national guard. he earned several recognitions for his valor, including the bronze star medal, purple heart, army commendation medal and army good conduct medal. since 2009, he worked as a full-time instructor with the north dakota national guard's 164th regional training institute camp grafton training center in devil's lake. sergeant first class lindy was a devoted and selfless leader as well as a committed family man. he enjoyed spending time with his family and friends. and he is survived by his wife adrienne and four children
over in europe move. the bundesbank, whatever it is over in germany, 44 basis points to 31. so that market moved. did have some movements in the market but you guys didn't pick it up. but it's important because it's important because you've got these series of puts over in europe. you've got the u.s. going, the series of puts in europe. relatively easy money. we expect some tightening at the year end but we didn't get them. i'm talking about bond markets. you see how spain, italy traded. so we're kind of nervous. the street is kind of out of paper so they can't screw it up right now. oh, shoot. i forgot to say hi to my mom! hi, mom! so that's important. because she'll get really mad if i don't. so, you have -- so you have -- >> you haven't said anything bad yet. it all sounds good. >> i'll tell you bad stuff if you want to hear it. >> no, we don't want to hear it. >> bottom line, joe, there's a trillion dollars, you got more money coming in of stimulus, and i got this market next year. so i got all kinds of different markets right now. i got credit markets which we know a lot a
roosevelt allowed japanese americans to enlist in the fight against nazi germany, inouye and thousands of young men answered the call. he burned with desire to defend the nation that had told him and people of his background -- quote -- "you may not serve." a nation that still held thousands of japanese americans behind barbed wire fences. and when he left hawaii for the army, his father told him this country has been good to us. whatever you do, do not dishonor this country. danny on more than one occasion told stories about his army training in mississippi, about the racial segregation that he saw. and he told the story of how after he returned from world war ii, he stopped in california on the way home to hawaii, just stopped to get a haircut and was told we don't serve johanns here. -- serve japs here. he stood there in full dress uniform, his chest covered in medals, a hook in place of the arm blown apart by a german rifle dpren aid, even -- grenade, even then he had to confront hatred. there is so much that is remarkable about the life of dan inouye. the story of his service on t
anne abblebaum on life in soviet east germany, poland and hungary from the end of world war through to 1956 and her historical narrative "iron curtain" sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." >> tonight on c-span farewell speeches and tributes from the 112th congress. first republican senator from indiana, richard lugar delivers his farewell speech from the senate floor followed by senator lugar's john kerr at a dinner for the anniversary of the senate relations committee and california representative lynn woolsey gives her farewell address to the house of representatives. she's followed by a tribute by other members of congress to outgoing california representatives. indiana senator dick lugar is retiring after the 112th congress. he won election to the senate in 1977. after serving two terms as mayor of indianapolis. and he's the longest serving u.s. senator in the and he is the longest-serving senator in the state's history, but he was defeated by the treasurer. he was chairman of the foreign relations committee from 1985 to 1987 and again from 2003 them 2007, and he is currently
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)